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Spring 2006 and Fall 2005

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Fall 2004and
Spring 2005

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Course Syllabi and Announcements
  LIT 165 Syllabus
  LIT 165 Announcements and Assignments
  WRT 120 Syllabus
  WRT 120 Announcements and Assignments

Notebook for Topics in Literature: Imaginary Worlds (Spring 2008)
  A Reading of THE TEMPEST

Notebook for Topics in Literature: Rites of Passage (Spring 2006)
  Goals of the Course
  Fundamental Questions about Literature
  Valuing Literature
  Critical Thinking and Reading Literature
  Critical Approaches to Literature
  Literature as ART
  Ambiguity
  Approaching the Art of Fiction
  Defining the Short Story
  Evaluating Short Fiction
  Craft of Fiction: PLOT
  Craft of Fiction: CHARACTER
  Small Group Exercise
  ARABY by James Joyce
  WHERE ARE YOU GOING, WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN? by Joyce Carol Oates
  Our RITES OF PASSAGE Theme
  A note about GIRL
  POE and the art of STORY OF A HOUR
  THE YELLOW WALLPAPER
  YOUNG MAN ON SIXTH AVENUE
  Notes on Innovative Fiction
  Assignment Sheet for Paper #1
  Fiction and Ambiguity - Your Questions
  Writing Workshop - Short Fiction
  Poetry Journal Project Assignment Sheet
  LITERARY SYNTHESIS PROJECT
  Defining Poetry
  Reading Poetry
  The Craft of Poetry
  Drama and Tragedy
  Study Questions: DEATH OF A SALESMAN

Notebook for Effective Writing I (Spring 2006)
  Paper #4 Assignment Sheet
  Critical Thinking and Commentary
  Casebook: Evaluating Sources Worksheet
  Selecting Information
  Evaluating Arguments
  CASEBOOK PROJECT Assignment Sheet
  Approaching Persuasive Writing
  Topic Development - Profile Essay
  Generating Ideas for the Profile Essay
  Paper #2 Assignment Sheet
  Profile Exercise
  Analyzing THE FIVE BEDROOM, SIX FIGURE ROOTLESS LIFE
  Objective Writing: Selected Readings
  Writing Workshop: Paper #1
  Expressive Writing in the NYTimes
  Writing Effective Introductions and Conclusions
  Paper #1: IDENTITY
  Expressive Writing
  Open Letter Exercise and Examples
  EMERSON on Individuality vs. Conformity
  Literature related to IDENTITY
  Understanding the 'Rhetorical Situation'

Go Exploring
  Weblog for WRT 120
  Writing Assistance on the Web
  Blackboard at WCU
  WCU Homepage
  WCU's Francis Harvey Green Library

Notebook for Topics in Literature: Imaginary Worlds (Fall 2005)
  One Last Look at Imaginary Worlds
  Franz Kafka's BEFORE THE LAW
  Analyzing WAITING FOR GODOT
  Approaching WAITING FOR GODOT
  Paper #3: Assignment Sheet
  Paper #4: Independent Project
  The Problem of Stability in BRAVE NEW WORLD
  UTOPIA/DYSTOPIA Links
  Analyzing Huxley's BRAVE NEW WORLD
  Defining Utopia
  Embarking on Huxley's BRAVE NEW WORLD
  A Reading of Shakespeare's THE TEMPEST
  From today's news (11/3/05)
  Assignment Sheet for Paper #2
  Goodbye to Dante's Imaginary World
  Stepping Through Dante's Inferno: Cantos 10-34
  Stepping Through Dante's Inferno: Cantos 1-10
  INFERNO: Questions/Analysis: Cantos 32-34
  INFERNO: Questions/Analysis: Cantos 18-31
  INFERNO: Questions for Analysis: Cantos 12-17
  INFERNO: Structure
  INFERNO: Questions for Analysis: Cantos 1-5
  INFERNO: Analyzing Canto 1
  Relating to Dante's Inferno
  Approaching Dante's DIVINE COMEDY
  A Little Help with Dante's INFERNO
  Assignment Sheet for Paper #1
  Notes on LEAF BY NIGGLE
  Responses to LEAF BY NIGGLE
  ON FAIRY STORIES: An Essay by Tolkien
  Notes on Axolotl
  Reading Ovid's Tales
  From Myth to Literature: Approaching Ovid's Tales
  Notes on THE EYE OF THE GIANT
  Functions of the Genesis Tales
  Analyzing Mythic Tales
  Defining Mythology
  Filtering the Introduction to FANTASTIC WORLDS
  Commentary on LA BELLE DAME SANS MERCI by Keats
  Commentary on DARKNESS by Byron
  Handout: Imagination Poems Set
  What is Imagination?
  Our Course Theme: Imaginary Worlds
  LIT 165 Assignments: Fall 2005
  LIT 165 Announcements: Fall 2005
  Imaginary Worlds: Course Syllabus

Notebook for Effective Writing I (Fall 2005)
  Paper #4: Independent Thinking/Reading/Writing
  Casebook Preparation Checklist
  Casebook Assignment Schedule
  Evaluating Sources for the Casebook
  Casebook Project Assignment Sheet
  Notes on Rational Argument
  Argument
  Assignment Sheet: Objective Writing
  Reviewing Elements of the Profile Essay
  Writing the Profile Essay
  Readings: Objective Writing
  Assignment Sheet: Expressive Writing
  Rubric for Evaluation of Writing
  About SKIN DEEP
  Emerson on Individuality vs. Conformity
  Mind-map: Identity
  Understanding the 'Rhetorical Situation'
  Assignments Page
  Announcements Page
  WRT 120 Course Syllabus for Fall 2005

ENG Q20: Basic Writing

Go Exploring
  Weblog for WRT 120
  Writing Assistance on the Web
  Blackboard at WCU
  WCU Homepage
  WCU's Francis Harvey Green Library

 
LIT 165: Topics in Literature
Independent Project: Literary Synthesis

Due: May, 2006 (final exam)
Length: 4-6 pages, typed, double spaced
Sources: One literary work and two outside sources, minimum
Manuscript and Documentation: Short paper format, MLA parenthetical citation style

THE ASSIGNMENT.  Choose any single literary work (short story, poem, or play) from your textbook (other texts may be used with approval) that interests you.  What makes you curious about this work?  For this assignment formulate and then answer a question that will deepen your understanding of the literary work you’ve chosen.  Achieve this by supplementing your reading of the literary work with research from the library.  Combine and present your understanding of the literary work together with your researched information in a synthesis essay.  Your goal is to enhance your reading of the literary work by digging for information that lies outside of the work itself.  The nature of the information you decide to hunt for is up to you.

SYNTHESIS CHOICES (Suggestive, not exclusive)
Choose only ONE of these angles to write a well-focused, in-depth essay.
  • Research the writer’s biography: find facts relating to the author’s life and relate them to the work.
  • Research some aspect of the work’s subject matter (i.e., marriage, gender roles, post traumatic stress syndrome, identity crisis, etc.) in greater depth or currency.
  • Research information on our “rites of passage” course theme and apply it to an analysis of the work you choose.
  • Research some aspect of the surrounding social context and relate it to the work.
  • Compare or contrast the work with another literary work(s) (for example, another work or works by the same author, with the same theme, same form, etc.)
  • Research professional critical opinion to supplement or substantiate your own analysis or interpretation
  • Apply one of the critical approach discussed in your textbook (see handout “Critical Approaches to Literature”)
  • Apply concepts from another discipline you have studied or are currently studying (sociological or psychological analysis, Marxism, feminism, quantum physics, etc.) to some aspect of the literary work (an interpretation of character, for example).    
SAMPLE QUESTIONS
  • What psychological illness does the wife in “The Yellow Wallpaper” seem to be suffering from?
  • What events in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s own life seem to have inspired “The Yellow Wallpaper”?
  • What was happening in the world in 1945 that might have given Shirley Jackson such a dark view of human nature in her chilling short story, “The Lottery”?
  • Does Langston Hughes’ portrayal of racism and discrimination in “Ballad of a Landlord” accurately reflect the time and place in which the poem was written and the time in which it is set?
  • What is a “mid-life crisis” and how does the husband’s character in the poem” Rain” seem to be suffering from one?  Is his experience typical or unique?
  • How do the stories “Eveline” by James Joyce, “Barn Burning” by William Faulkner, “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? By Joyce Carol Oates, and “A & P” by John Updike handle similar themes in unique ways?
RECALL THE RESEARCH PROCESS

Phase 1. SUBJECT -------  TOPIC ------- QUESTION
The SUBJECT is the literary work you choose to work with; the TOPIC is the angle you decide to pursue to enrich your understanding of the literary work.  There are several angles to choose from, some of which are listed and illustrated  below, but you can also pursue your own interests if you find your ideas don’t match those listed. Turn your topic into a QUESTION to focus your research and guide your search for sources.

Phase 2. GATHER INFORMATION------- TAKE NOTES-------------- FORM YOUR THESIS
Use the familiar library resources you can rely on to gather credible information; evaluate, analyze and select the best source material you can find.  Carefully note the bibliographic data for each source to avoid plagiarism. Your analysis of your material should help you arrive at your THESIS, a general, explicit statement which answers your research question and serves as the controlling idea for your essay.
 
Phase 3.  DRAFT YOUR PAPER
Write your paper in stages: the rough draft, the revised draft, and the final manuscript.

 

 

 

     

 


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